Disney Park Pack Pins

My son has been into things like Loot Crate and Geek Fuel lately, so when I heard that Disney was doing a similar type of pin box, I knew I had to try and sign up.

Unfortunately, I’m not the best with dates.  BUT, I do have insomnia, so while browsing Facebook on my phone at 6 am, I saw someone post about this appearing on the Disney Store website.

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It said Backorder, so I wasn’t sure if I’d actually get the item, since the main pin is limited edition, but I gave it a try.  I really didn’t see or hear anything again until I got the shipping notification yesterday.

The box arrived today, so, without further ado, lets take a peek!

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The pins are a Minnie Bow with an American Flag Pattern (open edition, but not yet released), Frozen with an exclusive Park Pack cardboard (limited edition of 500), and Dopey holding gems to his eyes (open edition, but not yet released).

Here’s a close up of the Frozen pin:

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Now, before anyone goes nuts – I’m sure Disney did a limited Frozen pin this time to encourage jealous among collectors (since everything Frozen still has a lot of popularity around it).  I’ve also heard rumor that there are four different colors of boarders for the Frozen pin, meaning there were 2,000 total made (just 500 of each color).  There is little to no chance that the next box, or really any other box for a year or more, will have a Frozen pin in it again.  If that is your only interest, and you are not a pin collector, I’d save the cash, personally.

The other two pins are open editions, as the online description foretold.  They are not yet released in the parks, though, so that is a fun bonus.  The back of the Dopey cardboard is labeled for the Silver level, the Minnie pin is not labeled at all, but I assume it’s in the same price bracket since there’s no elaborate or moving parts.

For those of you who haven’t gone pin shopping at a Disney park/resort – they list the pins by colors.  So, when you look at the price, it will say Blue, Red/Silver, Green, Yellow, or Pink on the back.  That way, when Disney raises prices, they only have to change out the price key instead of remarking all of the pins.  So, Silver would be the second-to-cheapest pins they offer, and, if memory serves, that would be the $9 color.  I’d also guesstimate that the Frozen pin, being limited, heavy, and having two layers (the pin image and the metal pin framing) that it would be about $16 for initial retail.  So, $9 + $9 + $16 = $34, but, I imagine the value of the Frozen pin is going to greatly increase soon.  So, even though, retail wise, the box comes up a bit short, the collectible value more than compensates for that.

But, side note – I’m not a scalper!  I do not buy things that I don’t want just to resell them for a profit.  It’s nice to have things appreciate in value in case you ever get in a pinch for money or are working on a fair trade for another item, but I personally detest the people who purposefully clear the shelves so that other people who actually want these items can’t get them for a fair price when they’re released.

My daughter also found where I put the box all back together and asked to do an unboxing video – so here’s that:

Disney Designer Dolls – Purchase with Caution!

I keep seeing a trend so I want to throw out a PSA on buying limited edition designer dolls on eBay, Amazon, Craigslists, or other similar venues.  

 

First, pay attention to the release dates of the item you want.  MOST online stores can only give you a buyer protection policy for a very limited amount of time (usually less than 2 months).  That means if you don’t complain within a set timeframe, your money is lost forever if there is a problem that arrises.  

Paypal, for example, usually will side with the buyer if a transaction goes bad, even if it’s something the seller can’t control (USPS damaging the item, primarily).  However, if you do not file your complaint within 45 days of your payment, your dispute is automatically cancelled and there is nothing you can do to reclaim your money.  So, if you purchase a “pre-order” item from an eBay seller and pay for it via Paypal on August 1st, the item has to be released and in your hands before September 14th to be able to file a dispute.  Otherwise, the seller can take your $600 pre-order money and mail you a $5 bargain bin doll from Walmart, and you can’t do a thing about it if the 45 day mark has passed.  

Why am I bringing this up?  Because Disney has once again released a beautiful set of Fairytale Couple dolls that are in high demand.  A new doll will soon be releasing every few weeks, but a small number of people were able to pre-order the complete set upfront.  The problem is, though, that Disney will not deliver the dolls to the buyers until all of the couples have been released (I believe October 22nd is the ship date), and many of the eBay resellers are listing their complete designer doll sets and getting $1,000 or more for them.  Imagine how many of those listings might be fake!  They were so difficult to get, there should not be that many already up on the market boards, so you have to wonder how valid their claims of having an entire set to re-sell are.  

Counterfeiting is also a big deal that happens a lot online, so never purchase a doll that is shown off via stock photos.  You’ll want to see real photos from multiple angles WITH the certificate of authenticity before you even consider buying.  Ask how they got the doll, and realize that if the answer isn’t “from the Disney Store” that it’s very likely a fake reproduction.  Some collectors will trade around, but if you can make hundreds of dollars off of a cheap knock off doll, you have to be very careful and educate yourself thoroughly about what you’re looking for.  Also, use good sense, because anyone can Google and steal images that others have posted, so have the buyer include a handwritten piece of paper next to the doll with their name/user name.  I hear a lot of people get irritated and roll their eyes over asking a seller to do this, but there’s no way I would give a stranger that much money if I wasn’t positive I was getting a genuine article.